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#1 Roger B

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 05:12 PM



I will be visiting St Bees in late October 2011 and would like to know if there are public and church sources available to conduct a genealogy source. I found what I believe is my great grandfather listed in the census for St. Bees in the 1860-1861 time frame. I don't recall thh exact year for the census. Joseph Boan was listed and on an separete line Alice Boan was listed. I have no idea who Alice might be or if she was related to Joseph. Joseph left England shortly after the Census and settled in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Unfortunately, no one in the family maintained any records. I would appreciate suggestions for where I might be able to check on records.

Thanks
Roger Boan
Warner Robins, Georgia, USA

#2 dotwalker

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 01:09 AM

Hello, Roger

I have been looking at the Censuses and trying to work out which Joseph Boan your ancestor could be. It's difficult without having a date of birth. I think he may have been the Joseph Boan, Sergeant, Ordnance, from England, who was stationed at Fort Henry, Baltimore City in 1900. He says in the Census that he was born in December 1850, immigrated in 1855, and married in 1889.

If he is your man, then I think he was born in Liverpool in 1850, the son of Henry Boan, a brickfield labourer, and his wife Zilpah. However, and this is the important point, Henry Boan was born in St Bees, around 1822-23.

In the 1860 US Census Henry and Zilpah appear in New Jersey (wrongly indexed as Boin), with their sons Joseph and Enoch. They are still in NJ, and correctly spelled, in 1870 and 1880.

I got back to Henry Boan of St Bees only after tracking another Joseph Boan who was born in St Bees in 1832, the son of William and Jane Boan. That Joseph Boan couldn't have been yours, as he became a prison warder in Yorkshire and died in England in 1898. But I have kept all his details 1832-1898 and will pass them on to you if you would like to see them.

You will be able to check all this for yourself when you get here. All the records you need, the St Bees parish church registers, the Censuses, etc, can be seen in the Cumbria Record Office in Scotch St, Whitehaven. It's only a very short train journey from St Bees, and the staff there are good at helping family historians.

I'm sure you'll enjoy your visit. I also had ancestors in St Bees, but unfortunately I don't live there.

Dot

#3 Roger B

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 03:22 PM

View Postdotwalker, on 30 August 2011 - 01:09 AM, said:

Hello, Roger

I have been looking at the Censuses and trying to work out which Joseph Boan your ancestor could be. It's difficult without having a date of birth. I think he may have been the Joseph Boan, Sergeant, Ordnance, from England, who was stationed at Fort Henry, Baltimore City in 1900. He says in the Census that he was born in December 1850, immigrated in 1855, and married in 1889.

If he is your man, then I think he was born in Liverpool in 1850, the son of Henry Boan, a brickfield labourer, and his wife Zilpah. However, and this is the important point, Henry Boan was born in St Bees, around 1822-23.

In the 1860 US Census Henry and Zilpah appear in New Jersey (wrongly indexed as Boin), with their sons Joseph and Enoch. They are still in NJ, and correctly spelled, in 1870 and 1880.

I got back to Henry Boan of St Bees only after tracking another Joseph Boan who was born in St Bees in 1832, the son of William and Jane Boan. That Joseph Boan couldn't have been yours, as he became a prison warder in Yorkshire and died in England in 1898. But I have kept all his details 1832-1898 and will pass them on to you if you would like to see them.

You will be able to check all this for yourself when you get here. All the records you need, the St Bees parish church registers, the Censuses, etc, can be seen in the Cumbria Record Office in Scotch St, Whitehaven. It's only a very short train journey from St Bees, and the staff there are good at helping family historians.

I'm sure you'll enjoy your visit. I also had ancestors in St Bees, but unfortunately I don't live there.

Dot

Yes. You have identified the correct Joseph Boan. I have a photograph of Joseph Boan sitting in the Ordnance Office at Fort McHenry about the turn of the century. Someone in teh family mentioned that there was a wife name Zilpa or Zilphia but I could never find such a person. I apprecaite your help in that now I have a new starting point.

By the way, there are two different Boan families still in New Jersey. One related to Henry & Joseph and a second that emigratred from Canada and settled in the same towns. I tried contacting every Boan in that area and received only one response and the response was very negative.

Thanks again,
Roger Boan

#4 dotwalker

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 08:33 PM

View PostRoger B, on 30 August 2011 - 03:22 PM, said:

View Postdotwalker, on 30 August 2011 - 01:09 AM, said:


Yes. You have identified the correct Joseph Boan. I have a photograph of Joseph Boan sitting in the Ordnance Office at Fort McHenry about the turn of the century. Someone in teh family mentioned that there was a wife name Zilpa or Zilphia but I could never find such a person. I apprecaite your help in that now I have a new starting point.

By the way, there are two different Boan families still in New Jersey. One related to Henry & Joseph and a second that emigratred from Canada and settled in the same towns. I tried contacting every Boan in that area and received only one response and the response was very negative.

Thanks again,
Roger Boan


I'm glad I got the right Joseph. He is in Liverpool in the 1851 Census (but no sign of an Alice). I also found his two elder siblings, one of whom was named Enoch after Zilpah's brother. The other, Sophia, died in infancy. I found Zilpah's maiden name and date and place of birth. Let me know if you want the details.

There are still quite a lot of Boans about over here. You can find them by doing a surname search on http://www.192.com/people/search/.

Good luck, and have a good trip!

Dot

#5 Roger B

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 08:16 PM

Dot,
You are accomplishing more in a few days that I have found in months. Yes, I would love to have a copy of any details you have. Now I would like a personal opinion. I rceived a note that I would have more access to records in the Recorsd Office in Whitehaven than in and around St. Bees. Any thoughts on that?
Roger

#6 dotwalker

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 10:09 PM

View PostRoger B, on 31 August 2011 - 08:16 PM, said:

Dot,
You are accomplishing more in a few days that I have found in months. Yes, I would love to have a copy of any details you have. Now I would like a personal opinion. I rceived a note that I would have more access to records in the Recorsd Office in Whitehaven than in and around St. Bees. Any thoughts on that?
Roger


#7 BobJ

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 10:33 PM

With reference to your post to Dot:

Yes - it's true that for genealogical purposes the Record Office is the best place. Most of our records are deposited there, where they can be cared for in ideal conditions. And yes, I know you'll find their people helpful.

Here in the village we have General History displays in the Priory, and various folders on topics which we amateur historians have researched - local shipwrecks, our War Dead, the Lighthouse and so on. Some of these also appear on the village website, under 'Publications' and elsewhere. You will also find in the Priory transcripts and analyses of the Census Data 1841-1901, the work of one of our History Group members.

If you find time, do visit the Priory Church - it's open all day, every day, for those interested in St. Bees history. And if you'd like to, phone 01946 824620 when you get here. I don't have Dot's genealogy expertise, but I'll happily come down to the Priory and give any general help I can.

Bob J

View PostRoger B, on 31 August 2011 - 08:16 PM, said:

Dot,
You are accomplishing more in a few days that I have found in months. Yes, I would love to have a copy of any details you have. Now I would like a personal opinion. I rceived a note that I would have more access to records in the Recorsd Office in Whitehaven than in and around St. Bees. Any thoughts on that?
Roger


#8 dotwalker

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 11:54 PM

Roger, I'm glad to be able to help.

1841 Census for West Cottingwith, Thorganby parish, Yorkshire (SE of York):-
Henry Matthews, 40, farmer
Jane, 40, wife
Zilpah, 20, daughter
William, 18, son
Enoch, 15, son
Miriam, 15, daughter
[all children born Yorkshire]

Zilpah Matthews, daughter of Henry Matthews, married Henry Boan, son of William Boan, St Laurence, York, 12 October 1843.
Sophia, daughter of Henry Boan, labourer, of Smethurst St, Oldham, Lancashire, and his wife Zilpah baptised St Mary, Oldham, 30 December 1845; buried Oldham 1846.
Enoch William, son of Henry and Zilpah, born Oldham December quarter 1846
Joseph, son of Henry Boan and Zilpah, born Liverpool December quarter 1849

1851 Census for Liverpool:-
2, Idris St.
Henry Boan, 29, Brickfield lab. born Cumberland Bees
Zilpah, 29, wife, b. Yorkshire Cottingwith
Enoch Wm, 4, son, b. Lancashire Liverpool [but born in Oldham according to the births register, see above!]
Joseph, 1, son, b. Lancashire Liverpool

This info came from the following online sources:
www.freebmd.org.uk
www.familysearch.org
www.ancestry.com
www.lan-opc.org.uk

If you are looking for Joseph's father, Henry Boan, and his father, William, and their antecedents, you will be starting your search with Henry's birth in 1821-22 and working backwards from then. Your main source, I'd say the only source, will be the St Bees parish registers, which are in the Record Office in Whitehaven. At the Record Office you will also be able to see the Censuses for all the English counties, which begin in 1841; and the official registers of birth, marriage and death, which begin in the September quarter of 1837. You can use their computers to consult all the online sources I've listed above. And you can get very good advice from the staff.

As Bob says, the great thing to do in St Bees is to visit the Priory church. Don't miss it! And make yourself known to people. Cumbrians are very friendly.

Best wishes

Dot

#9 Roger B

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 02:48 AM

If the responses I have received in the last two days are any indication of the friendliness, I must say it seems outstanding. I am looking forward to spending some time in St. Bees. The help I have received is outstanding.

Roger

#10 lavertine

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 05:48 PM

View PostRoger B, on 01 September 2011 - 02:48 AM, said:

If the responses I have received in the last two days are any indication of the friendliness, I must say it seems outstanding. I am looking forward to spending some time in St. Bees. The help I have received is outstanding.

Roger

Can i second that - I visited st bees last month and the help i received was exceptional, I am astounded by the family information i found. St Bees is a lovely place, the people on this site are extremely helpful. The visit to the priory is worth it, the St Bees man exhibition is very interesting and there is lots of files with local history. If you are visiting the family history center in whitehaven, it is not too far from st bees and they have a small car pack at the back. I stayed in a local B & B (fleatham house) which was like everything else i found in St Bees - exceptional and nothing was too much trouble.

You will enjoy your visit and like me you have already found that contacting this site has made the visit worthwhile.

regards
lavertine

#11 Roger B

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 05:08 PM

Although I now live in the Deep South, compliments of the US Air Force, I went through High School in Canada. Mant times I heard the comment that the US and the UK were two great countries divided by a common language. I thought it was just a cute comment until recently. One of the posts recommended a place to stay in St. Bees so I looked up places. One place states it takes residents only. I take that to mean is does not take foreign tourists. A second place stated it was a Free Hotel. OK. I give up. What is a Free Hotel? Not associated with a major corporation? Even living in Canada didn't help with that phrase.
Roger

#12 BobJ

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 10:30 AM

Yes - you're about right with the 'Free Hotel'. It means it doesn't belong to a particular brewery. There'll be a larger choice of ales available - though not much 'free' about them.

I'm more puzzled about 'residents only' and haven't noticed it on the places on our website. At a guess, I'd say it means they're licensed to supply alcohol only to people staying, not passing trade. But that may not be right; if you let me know where you saw it I'll go along and ask.

But I'm sure it doesn't mean 'no foreigners' - and certainly not no Americans. We haven't forgotten John Paul Jones' dastardly behaviour in 1778, but plenty of Americans come here and I think they're always made welcome. Indeed we've had rows of them (students) sleeping across our living room floor, and the T-shirt I'm wearing today says "Lycoming College PA - Two Centuries of History". (Dare I say that if that's all the history we had, I'd keep quiet about it?)

You're right, of course, about the language. When we study WW2 in the village school I talk about what arrived with the Americans: Spam and Prem and Hormel (lovely to my 11- year old taste) but also radio instead of wireless, truck instead of lorry, candy instead of sweets. My Dad said they'd never catch on. He wasn't often so wrong!

Bob

View PostRoger B, on 12 September 2011 - 05:08 PM, said:

Although I now live in the Deep South, compliments of the US Air Force, I went through High School in Canada. Mant times I heard the comment that the US and the UK were two great countries divided by a common language. I thought it was just a cute comment until recently. One of the posts recommended a place to stay in St. Bees so I looked up places. One place states it takes residents only. I take that to mean is does not take foreign tourists. A second place stated it was a Free Hotel. OK. I give up. What is a Free Hotel? Not associated with a major corporation? Even living in Canada didn't help with that phrase.
Roger


#13 Roger B

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 04:35 PM

View PostBobJ, on 13 September 2011 - 10:30 AM, said:

Yes - you're about right with the 'Free Hotel'. It means it doesn't belong to a particular brewery. There'll be a larger choice of ales available - though not much 'free' about them.

I'm more puzzled about 'residents only' and haven't noticed it on the places on our website. At a guess, I'd say it means they're licensed to supply alcohol only to people staying, not passing trade. But that may not be right; if you let me know where you saw it I'll go along and ask.

But I'm sure it doesn't mean 'no foreigners' - and certainly not no Americans. We haven't forgotten John Paul Jones' dastardly behaviour in 1778, but plenty of Americans come here and I think they're always made welcome. Indeed we've had rows of them (students) sleeping across our living room floor, and the T-shirt I'm wearing today says "Lycoming College PA - Two Centuries of History". (Dare I say that if that's all the history we had, I'd keep quiet about it?)

You're right, of course, about the language. When we study WW2 in the village school I talk about what arrived with the Americans: Spam and Prem and Hormel (lovely to my 11- year old taste) but also radio instead of wireless, truck instead of lorry, candy instead of sweets. My Dad said they'd never catch on. He wasn't often so wrong!

Bob

View PostRoger B, on 12 September 2011 - 05:08 PM, said:

Although I now live in the Deep South, compliments of the US Air Force, I went through High School in Canada. Mant times I heard the comment that the US and the UK were two great countries divided by a common language. I thought it was just a cute comment until recently. One of the posts recommended a place to stay in St. Bees so I looked up places. One place states it takes residents only. I take that to mean is does not take foreign tourists. A second place stated it was a Free Hotel. OK. I give up. What is a Free Hotel? Not associated with a major corporation? Even living in Canada didn't help with that phrase.
Roger


#14 Roger B

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 04:40 PM

Regarding the hotel comment about residents and non-residents: in an earlier post, the Fleatham House was recommended. The first thing I did was to look up the Fleatham House site and at the top of the site is the statement that it is not open to non-residents. So, I simply lloked else where. If my interpretation is incorrect, the site should include a clarification for us simple folks.
Roger B

#15 BobJ

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 07:43 PM

Roger, this gets odder. I've looked at Fleatham's site - www.fleathamhouse.com - and at their slot on several of the others, like TripAdvisor, and I can't see the offending words at all! Still, they must be appearing somewhere so I'll pass your remarks on.


I see they've had plenty of good reviews, and there's what Lavertine said in this correspondence a few days ago: " I stayed in a local B & B (fleatham house) which was like everything else i found in St Bees - exceptional and nothing was too much trouble". So it's all rather a pity.

There are other good ones, though, so I'm sure you'll enjoy your visit. Do let me know if we can help at all when you're here.

Bob




View PostRoger B, on 13 September 2011 - 04:40 PM, said:

Regarding the hotel comment about residents and non-residents: in an earlier post, the Fleatham House was recommended. The first thing I did was to look up the Fleatham House site and at the top of the site is the statement that it is not open to non-residents. So, I simply lloked else where. If my interpretation is incorrect, the site should include a clarification for us simple folks.
Roger B





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